AP-NC–North Carolina News Digest,1st Ld-Writethru, NC


Hello! The Carolinas News Editor is Tim Rogers. The breaking news supervisor is Jonathan Drew.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with updates.

TOP STORIES:

FATAL BUS CRASH

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Authorities say the bus driver and a 10-year-old child are among the four people killed when a bus carrying a junior college football team crashed on a North Carolina highway. By Jeffrey Collins. SENT: 600 words.

POLITICS OF PAIN-NORTH CAROLINA

RALEIGH, N.C. — Manufacturers of opioid painkillers and allied advocacy groups have given more than $63 million to state political campaigns in the past decade, but less than one percent of that in North Carolina, a joint investigation by The Associated Press and the Center for Public Integrity found. By Emery P. Dalesio. SENT: 700 words.

CHANGING FARMLAND

GRAHAM, N.C. — North Carolina has a rich agricultural history, and throughout the centuries it has been an industry that continues to change, evolve — and shrink. “No nation has ever had so few people actually farming,” J. Paul Lilly, a professor at N.C. State University, wrote in a 1990s paper, “Agricultural History of North Carolina,” now published on the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services website. “This is a social change that has isolated most people from rural life and from an appreciation of the compactness and uncertainties of food production.” By Bill Cresenzo of The Times-News of Burlington. An AP Member Exchange. SENT: Moved in advance for use in Monday editions.

DRONES-LINE OF SIGHT

FARGO, N.D. — As thousands of commercial drones take to the skies under new Federal Aviation Administration rules, some small operators are pursuing a coveted exemption that would allow them to fly their drones where they can’t be seen by the pilot. The companies who want them say the so-called line-of-sight exemptions are essential to someday use drones for such tasks as cleanup and repair after storm damage and monitoring widespread crop conditions. But thus far, the FAA has only given exemptions to three companies that participated in a year-long FAA pilot program: CNN, BNSF Railway and the drone data company PrecisionHawk, which is based in North Carolina. By Dave Kolpack. Sent: 600 words, photos.

IN BRIEF:

— WRECK-SHOOTING — Authorities say a Charlotte police officer who thought he was checking on a wreck instead found one man dead and a second hurt in a shooting. SENT.

— LGBT RIGHTS-NORTH CAROLINA — North Carolina’s governor is dropping a lawsuit defending a law limiting LGBT protections as he pursues similar arguments in a separate case. SENT.

— GULLAH INSTITUTE — Coastal Carolina University is opening a new institute to study Gullah culture. SENT.

— LITTER SWEEP — Folks are sprucing up the highways and byways of North Carolina. The annual fall Litter Sweep campaign of the state Department of Transportation is getting underway this weekend and continues through Oct. 1. SENT.

SPORTS:

FBN–49ERS-PANTHERS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Reigning league MVP Cam Newton and the Panthers look for their first win when they return home to face the San Francisco 49ers, who are coming off a shutout win in Week 1. By Steve Reed. UPCOMING. 700 words, photos. Game starts at 1 p.m. EDT.

If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to [email protected] If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, ([email protected]) or call 888-273-6867. For access to AP Exchange and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at [email protected] or 877-836-9477.

The AP, Raleigh

comments powered by Disqus